Pages Menu
TwitterFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Feb 23, 2014 in Blog, Change, Feature, Travel |

Dear X, You Changed My Life

Dear X, You Changed My Life

This is an open letter to people I met through my study, volunteer, and work experiences across more than a dozen countries over the last decade. These individuals impacted me in a profound way but will likely never know it. Dear … Joel, We sat down on overturned buckets in a slum on the outskirts of Lima, Peru and talked for a few hours. I was 17 and I thought I had something to say to you about truth and life. You did not correct me. Instead, you created a crack in my worldview by sharing your story and asking me thoughtful questions. Years later, I finally understood that my ignorance, arrogance, and good intentions blinded me to reality. I have never forgotten. Zachary, I read your interview in the university newspaper as the first openly gay student president at the University of South Carolina. I kept that article for some time and thought about it for years. You were clear, unapologetic, and gracious towards those who mistreated you...

Read More

Posted by on Jan 13, 2014 in Culture, Feature, Guest Post, Travel |

Finding Art & Beauty In an Unexpected Place

Finding Art & Beauty In an Unexpected Place

This is a guest post by British travel writer Gaby Lucius. Read her bio below! It was late June and the summer doldrums had me bored and restless. My freelance work had slowed and if I hadn’t been so damn hot, I would have been bouncing off the walls. “Why don’t we go to Vegas?” my husband proposed after work one day. “Vegas? What the hell, Mike? Can’t you come up with something slightly more inventive?” The thing is, when I get hot, I get grumpy. The thought of going someplace decidedly hotter than Portland was not appealing. From the first day of our married life, Mike and I had been working hard to see the most beautiful parts of the world. We’d been to Singapore, Cambodia, France, Belgium, Russia…I could go on and on. We’d enjoyed home cooked meals with local families, hiked through humid jungles and thoroughly explored ancient temples. We made a point to avoid the tourist traps like the plague. And here he was asking me if I wanted to go...

Read More

Posted by on Dec 11, 2013 in Culture, Feature, Guest Post, Teach Abroad, Travel, Travel Planning, Work Abroad |

Making the Most of Teaching English in Thailand

Making the Most of Teaching English in Thailand

This is a guest post by Robert Oakden. See his profile below! Congratulations on deciding to explore the world! Thailand is a truly stunning country, with a fascinating culture and friendly population – not to mention the weather. In fact, we’re starting to get a little jealous of your adventure – can we come too? Spending a year teaching abroad isn’t the same simply traveling. There are similar perks, but being a TEFL teacher is a job and possibly the start of a career. So before you pack us into your suitcase, here are some tips on how to make the most of your time teaching abroad. Get qualified Strictly speaking, it is possible to get a teaching job without a certification, however, a TEFL qualification is a fantastic way to learn the trade and it will certainly make getting a position easier. There are plenty of online courses to choose from that you can complete in your own time over the course of around six months, or you can opt to complete an...

Read More

Posted by on Oct 16, 2013 in Blog, Feature, International Education, Scholarships, Study Abroad, Teach Abroad, Travel, Travel Planning, Volunteer Abroad, Work Abroad |

How to Choose an International Program

How to Choose an International Program

During my time as a study abroad advisor, I was frequently asked the question, Which program is better? There are no “right” or “wrong” choices when choosing an international program*, only different outcomes and consequences. Ask these 10 questions to determine which international program is right for you. *Choose an international program through a reputable organization that offers international programs! If you don’t know any reputable programs, check out GoAbroad.com or GoOverseas.com. 1. Why am I traveling?  Write down every reason you can think of as to why you are interested in traveling, studying, working, or volunteering abroad. Maybe you want to see a new place, learn a new language, or know what it is like to live outside of the country. This is good, keep going. Are you trying to accomplish something through traveling that you cannot accomplish at home? Was there a particular moment, conversation, person, or idea that inspired you to pursue an international opportunity? What are your goals? Are you trying to get away from something...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 8, 2013 in Feature, International Education, Study Abroad, technology and travel, Travel |

5 Ways to Use Social Media to Tell Your Study Abroad Story

5 Ways to Use Social Media to Tell Your Study Abroad Story

Social media provides dynamic spaces to share your study abroad story. That story begins the moment you decide to go and continues long after you return home. The idea is not to be glued to your computer all day but to thoughtfully use social media to engage your community throughout your study abroad experience.  1. Curate Your Study Abroad Story Curation means carefully choosing, creating, and sharing visually or conceptually interesting content via a distribution outlet, in this case, social media. People gravitate towards content that conveys particular themes, messages, or moods but tend to ignore an information dump. (A classic example of an info-dump is the rambling travelogue…. “Then I did this and went here and saw this and met so and so.”) Try one of the following or come up with your own idea (and share it with us below in the comments!) Take a photograph every day of a part of your daily routine (ie taking a bus to class, going to market, etc.) and put it...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 5, 2013 in Blog, Change, Travel |

Do I Travel to Escape?

Do I Travel to Escape?

—I had to come home, he said. —How long were you gone? I asked. —6 months of constant travel. Long enough to get to the point where anywhere was okay. Do you know what I mean? he asked staring me in the eye. I did know what he meant. I do know what he means. Travelers escape through their familiar atmosphere to become satellites, orbits in a night sky — observing and participating from a distance.  —It’s scary stuff, he said and then retracted from the conversation to curl up into a memory. In this brief pause, an argument of defense welled up from my cherished memories on the road. But the conversation changed as quickly as it began and the moment was gone. I thought about what he said and how he challenged not only my sentiments about travel but also the trajectory of my life. Am I close to a dangerous detachment? Is this travel as a lifestyle, this perpetual suspension an escape, excuse, or cop out? Yes/No. It is...

Read More